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Avoid making mistakes in divorce that could harm children

| Aug 7, 2020 | Child Custody |

Many parents in Ohio who get divorced make mistakes that can have a lasting impact on their children. It is important for parents who want to divorce to take steps to minimize the harm that could be caused by their actions during and after their divorce.

Children have a hard time understanding why people divorce. Since they frequently do not understand the conflicts between their parents, they might believe that they did something to cause the divorce or that they might be able to do things that will stop the process and keep their parents together. To prevent these problems, parents should talk to their children together and explain that they are not responsible for the divorce. They should also explain that the children can’t do anything to stop the divorce from happening. Divorcing parents should refrain from saying negative things about each other to or in front of their children.

Families build traditions around holidays and birthdays. During a divorce, dealing with the changes in these special events can be difficult for children. Parents who can agree to get along during these occasions for their children’s sake might try holding joint celebrations. At a minimum, they should allow the children to spend time with both parents during the holidays and on their birthdays.

The way that parents conduct themselves during divorce can have a lasting impact on their children. While divorce is frequently filled with bitter feelings and resentment, parents should remember that their children love both parents and need emotional support during divorce as they try to deal with the changes in their lives. An experienced divorce attorney might offer a logical analysis of the situation to allow his or her client to step away from the emotional conflicts. This may help parents to reach child custody agreements that allow their children to develop into well-adjusted adults.